TS History

First World War
 
                                                                                                                                                                  
 
 
The origins of the Tyneside Scottish are in the Kitchener's Army and the call to arms in World War I. The Recruitment to the British Army during World War I saw the raising of the Pals battalion. The Tyneside Scottish Committee was formed and raised the Tyneside Scottish Brigade of four service Battalions of the Northumberland Fusiliers. The Brigade's first major action was the Battle of the Somme where it sustained a large number of casualties. The Brigade was subsequently brought up to strength and served at Armentiers, Battle of Arras (1917), and the final battles of 1918. The Brigade was disbanded in 1919.
 
 1914 Call to Arms   
 1915 Training  
 1916 France Somme Armentieres
 1917 Arras 3rd Ypres
 1918  Lys  
 Post War Laying up of Colours TS Memorial 

 

1914-1916 four service battalions and two reserve battalions raised in The Northumberland Fusiliers:

Source: Long Long Trail

20th (Service) Battalion (1st Tyneside Scottish)
Formed at Newcastle, 14 October 1914, by the Lord Mayor and City.
June 1915 : came under orders of 102nd Brigade, 34th Division.
Landed in France in January 1916.
3 February 1918 : disbanded in France.
 
21st (Service) Battalion (2nd Tyneside Scottish)
Formed at Newcastle, 26 October 1914, by the Lord Mayor and City.
June 1915 : came under orders of 102nd Brigade, 34th Division.
Landed in France in January 1916.
3 February 1918 : disbanded in France.
 
22nd (Service) Battalion (3rd Tyneside Scottish)
Formed at Newcastle, 5 November 1914, by the Lord Mayor and City..
June 1915 : came under orders of 102nd Brigade, 34th Division.
Landed in France in January 1916.
17 May 1918 : reduced to cadre strength; returned to England 18 June 1918 with the 16th (Irish)Division.
18 June 1918 : absorbed new 38th Bn, and then attached to 48th Brigade, 16th Division.
Landed in France in July 1918.
 
23rd (Service) Battalion (4th Tyneside Scottish)
Formed at Newcastle, 16 November 1914, by the Lord Mayor and City..
June 1915 : came under orders of 102nd Brigade, 34th Division.
Landed in France in January 1916.
17 May 1918 : reduced to cadre strength.
17 June 1918 : transferred to 116th Brigade, 39th Division.
29 July 1918 : transferred to 197th Brigade, 66th (2nd East Lancashire) Division.
20 September 1918 : transferred with 197th Brigade to Lines of Communication.

29th (Reserve) Battalion
Formed in Alnwick in July 1915 as a reserve battalion, from depot companies of Tyneside Scottish Bns.
1 September 1916 : converted into 84th Training Reserve Battalion in 20th Reserve Brigade
 
33rd (Reserve) Battalion
Formed in Hornsea in June 1916 from 29th (Reserve) Battalion.
1 September 1916 : converted into 80th Training Reserve Battalion in 19th Reserve Brigade.
 
Second World War

In 1939 the TA expanded and the 9th Battalion Durham Light Infantry duplicate Battalion (12 DLI) was authorised to be raised as the Tyneside Scottish.  

1939.03.31 12th (Tyneside Scottish) Battalion, The Durham Light Infantry
  • Formed in T.A. as duplicate of 9th Battalion, DLI

 

 

 The Battalion immediately sought the affiliation with a Scottish unit and became the 1st Battalion Tyneside Scottish, Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment).

The Battalion became part of of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF). On 23 April 1940 whilst only partly trained and under equipped the unit was sent to France. On the 20 May 1940 the unit was encircled by the advancing German Army and after five hours of fighting was overrun.Those who were not casualties or taken prisioner were evacuated from Dunkirk.

Following a period of Home Defence, 1TS joined the 49th (West Riding) Division and were sent to Iceland. Returning to England in 1942 to preparefor the Invasion of Normandy in 1944.

The Tyneside Scottish landed in Normandy 12th June 1944 (D+6). The Battalion were engaged in Operation Martlet gaining the Battle Honour "Defence of Rauray". Following the Battle and subsequent actions in the Caen area, the Battalion was reduced to cadre strength and subsequently placed in suspended animation.

 1st Battalion Tyneside Scottish

1940.02.01 1st Battalion, The Tyneside Scottish, The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment)
  • 1944.11.15 disbanded
 1939 - 1940 British Expeditionary Force
 1941 - 1942 Iceland
 1943 - 1944 UK
 1944 Normandy
 Post War TS Memorial
 
Post War
In 1947 on the re-constitution of the Territorial Army, the honour title passed to the Royal Artillery. Initially the title was held by 670th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment, RA (Tyneside Scottish), before passing to a Battery of 439th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment, RA. In 1974, the title was adopted by 204 Battery of 101st (Northumbrian) Regiment Royal Artillery (Volunteers).
 
 

 
 1947 to 1955 670th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment RA TA 
 1956 - 1967 439th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment RA TA 
 1967 - Date 204 (Tyneside Scottish) Battery RA (V) 
 

Royal Artillery

1947.01.01 670th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment, RA (Tyneside Scottish)

  • Reconstituted in T.A. with HQ at Newcastle
1955.03.10 S (Tyneside Scottish) Battery, 439th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment, RA
1956.10.31 Q (Tyneside Scottish) Battery, 439th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment, RA
  • 1967.04.01 disbanded and concurrently re-formed as two units:
    • Tyneside Scottish troop, 204 Battery, 101st (Northumbrian) Medium Regiment, RA in TAVR II
    • D Company (Tyneside Scottish), The 4th/5th/6th (Territorial) Battalion, The Royal Northumberland Fusiliers in TAVR III

1974 204 (Tyneside Scottish) Medium Battery, 101st (Northumbrian) Medium Regiment, RA
(redesignation of 204 Battery from its Scottish troop)

1976 204 (Tyneside Scottish) Field Battery, 101st (Northumbrian) Field Regiment, RA
1993 204 (Tyneside Scottish) Battery, 101st (Northumbrian) Regiment, RA